Crooks posing as Daytona Beach police

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Over the past two weeks, Daytona Beach victims have lost several hundred thousand dollars to one particular scam where someone is impersonating the police. Detective Sergeant. Tim Ehrenkaufer says technology is a blessing and a curse. He explains that it’s a curse if someone uses a website to create fake phone numbers that appear to be from legitimate sources. “You can even have a voice changer on it and a few other options here and then make scam calls,” he said. Suspects recently impersonated locals, claiming to be a Daytona Beach police officer. It’s easy enough to find an officer’s name, then using technology, suspects call from a number that belongs to the agency. in the system between the villain and the victim,” Ehrenkaufer said. Detective Erhenkaufer used a free app to spoof Claire Metz from WESH 2. The call appeared to be spam, but if he had paid for it, he would have shown his own number. Suspects get information about people and loved ones on social media, then call to say they’ve been arrested and demand a fee or gift card payment. member,” Erhenkaufer said. The police will never request payment by gift card. They say it’s an immediate red flag. “Hang up. If it’s important, you can call them back. If they tell you you need to answer now, don’t. That should also raise a red flag,” Erhenkaufer said. stolen money and lawsuits like this are very rare as suspects hide behind technology, more often than not, in other countries.

Over the past two weeks, Daytona Beach victims have lost several hundred thousand dollars to one particular scam where someone is impersonating the police.

Detective Sergeant. Tim Ehrenkaufer says technology is a blessing and a curse. He explains that it’s a curse if someone uses a website to create fake phone numbers that appear to be from legitimate sources.

“You can even have a voice changer on it and a few other options here and then make scam calls,” he said.

Suspects recently impersonated locals, claiming to be a Daytona Beach police officer. It’s easy enough to find an officer’s name, then using technology, suspects call from a number that belongs to the agency.

“They put that as a fake number. It doesn’t matter if it belongs to something else, because it’s a spoof in the system between the villain and the victim,” Ehrenkaufer said.

Detective Erhenkaufer used a free app to spoof Claire Metz from WESH 2. The call appeared to be spam, but if he had paid for it, he would have shown his own number. Suspects get information about people and their relatives on social media, then call saying they’ve been arrested and asking for a fee or gift card payment.

“It’s heartbreaking to think you’re doing the right thing for a family member,” Erhenkaufer said.

The police will never request payment by gift card. They say it’s an immediate red flag.

“Hang up. If it’s important, you can call them back. If they tell you you need to answer now, don’t. That should also raise a red flag,” Erhenkaufer said.

Recovering the stolen money and prosecuting cases like this is very rare as suspects hide behind technology, more often than not, in other countries.

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